The artist’s role in society

The artist’s role in society

Recently I’ve been thinking about professions, pay, and service. Why do some professions pay more than others? For instance, why does a doctor get paid more hourly than a barista? This has nothing to do with the worthwhile efforts of either of the people holding these jobs. You could be the best barista on the planet, make the best cup of coffee in the world and serve it with pleasantness, with a design in the foam of your own making. However, as long as you stay a barista, you will not be compensated for your time and expertise in the way that a doctor will. Why?

Our frenemy named food

Our frenemy named food

How many people do you know with a food allergy?
How many people do you know who have a digestion problem?
How many people do you know who, for some reason or other, just don't feel right after eating?

Love & fame

Love & fame

A year ago, I moved to Philadelphia to do two things: to live with my girlfriend, who had just taken a teaching position in Wilmington, and to write. I had just graduated from the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, where I studied poetry. I had 30-something pages of thesis manuscript to work with, all of which I've since abandoned. I wrote a few new poems. I worked two jobs. I published a book review. I read submissions, briefly, for a poetry journal. I started a blog.

Reading as a creative act

Reading as a creative act

In the introduction to the wonderfully insightful book Genership 1.0, David Castro writes, "The journey of self-discovery involves the possibility of transcendence. The effort to see ourselves changes us. Thomas Mann reminded us that '[n]o one remains quite what he was when he recognizes himself.' We are the sculptor; we are the stone. The strangely transformational search for true human nature belongs not only to myth-makers, poets and philosophers.